Catching up with Rob Whyte at Blush Design on the power of strong brand identity

Blush-Create-Stop-Cyberbullying-Day-interview

You’ve been integral to all of the designs for Stop Cyberbullying Day. How easy or difficult was it to find a design to appeal to all demographics?

Bullying affects everyone whether that be through personal experience, knowing somebody who has been a victim of it or seeing the effects of it on others. For this reason we are as much the audience as any other group of people we would be trying to target. Using this as the foundation of our design, we feel that as long as the concepts we created spoke to us and were accessible and sympathetic to the cause, then we were on the right track.

How important is a clear visual identity when putting together a large-scale global event of any kind?

In today’s world of globally accessible content, we are constantly switched on to the need for any communications to be both appealing and instantly decipherable by any number of audiences. Also graphic design more generally is the practice of breaking down a message to its most concise and effective form. Taken together both these factors mean that we’re always geared up to create visuals that are ready to be seen and understood by the greatest amount of people and so this particular project was no different.

What was the process for discovering the identity for Stop Cyberbullying Day?

We set out by soaking up as much of Cybersmile’s culture as we could. From researching their audience, to studying past design material. This gave us a clear direction for generating initial design concepts.
A new, multi-colored brand device in the form of geometric shapes was created; aiming to capture the charity’s energetic and dynamic personality.
The use of pattern, photography and vibrant colours gives the brand endless configurations to create different shapes and graphics.

Some of the biggest celebrities and companies are involved in Stop Cyberbullying Day. How did it feel to be working on a project alongside them?

We were already honored by being chosen to work alongside such a great charity and the added involvement of people in all areas of public life only helped to bolster the campaign. It also makes it very exciting to watch a campaign message grow when shared amongst leading influential figures and so we felt privileged to be part of that.

Fast-forward 10 years. Where do you see social media going and how do you see the relationship between social media and design at that point?

We’re actually quite optimistic about the future of social media in so much that it currently feels as though we are experiencing an evolutionary period whereby we’re all learning acceptable etiquette when online. Once people have adjusted to into seeing that consequences for their behaviour in the real world also apply in cyberspace, then we should all be well equipped to treat each other better in online spaces. Add to this that the internet can be a great tool to unite people, hold power to account and elicit positive change and all-in-all, social media could ultimately be a force for good. Design that bears all of these points in mind and seeks to boost the factors will mean we make more progress towards a happier online experience for everyone.

In 10 words or less, why is it important for anybody reading this to get involved on Stop Cyberbullying Day?

You wouldn’t want it to happen to you. So help!